• where to live in Madrid?
  • Where to live in Spain?

    So you've moved to the bustling city of Madrid to follow your TEFL certificate and have enrolled into a reputed institute, or maybe even got a good enough job to support yourself; can there be better news? but wait a minute out there. Surely you can't keep shelling out a fortune for hotels and couch surfing doesn't sound so appealing after 8 days straight on the sofa. 

    Finding a place to reside in is one of the most hair pulling and stressful tasks when relocating to a new country. But luckily, we'll try to unscramble the Greek and Latin of home ownership in Spain for you today.

    Hostels

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    Perfect for those who want a cheap and affordable accommodation in the heart of the city. You would have to deal with curfews, food, restriction and the like though. €100-200 per month 

         

    Dormitory

    tefl housing in madrid

    Back to the days of college with bunk beds and sleepovers. One of the best options for those with a very tight budget. Expect to forego your privacy/freedom though and  being awoken at ungodly hours. €100-200 per month       

     

    Shared apartments

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    If you can find mates whom you get along with, then this might just be your thing. Along with freedom, your costs would come down quite a bit while you retain a sense of privacy. €200-300 per month 

     

    Individual apartments

    tefl live in madrid

     

    Hands down the most personal and expensive choice. You ought to shell out around €500 euros + taxes/maintanence for a one bed room apartment in the city centre. Coupled with food and transportation, you can rack quite a bill yet the freedom your own home affords is unmatchable. €400-500 per month       

    Things to keep in mind:

    If you're going through the official route and getting contracts for your home, them you'll be required to share your NIE, foreign identity number. 

    Most property owners will require you to keep down a deposit and show your employment/educational proof in the city.

    The price ranges can vary widely, from €300 in the city centre, to half the price on the outskirts. Likewise if you're sharing an apartment rather than renting it outright individually. Long term rental options can also be arranged, with separate options available for couples and groups  

    House owners and estate agents work independently most of times and have their own way of working. So find out who you're dealing with.                                                                               

    How to find a home in Spain

    Most of the time your educational institutes or employer can help you in finding a good accommodation. Failing that, you can look up on estate agents or even contact property owners directly. Just walk around the neighbourhood and you're likely to see tolet signs. 

    You can also check online. There are various websites with genuine listing for rentals. Some of the best ones include

    http://www.pisocompartido.com/en/

    No middle man, direct contact with owners/occupants. Great for individual rooms

    http://www.fotocasa.es/en/ 

    A wide variety and a great range of properties but inundated by agents.

    http://www.idealista.com/ 

    User friendly site with good property range, although a bit expensive. Different housing options available.

    http://www.enalquiler.com/ 

    Good website for finding solid rooms/flats although you need a good hold over Spanish to navigate through.                                                                                    

    Finally, do also remember to check out expatistan, a great place to keep up to date on cost of living and prices in city you're planning to move into. It also has a nifty comparison calculator.  

     

    So...You could have picked millions of people to follow…GREAT choice. Thank you!!

    Give us your feedback.

    TEFL MADRID ACADEMY.

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